Agile Testing Days Netherlands – February 13, 2014

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Agile Testing Days 2014 in Den Haag, Netherlands is coming up, and I’ve been blessed enough to be part of the team of speakers.

The guys who put together these conferences are top notch. This will be my 4th event with them!

I love presenting to the people here in Europe. Awesome people. Lots to learn. What a great “job” we have!

Hope to see you there!

-ps

Using Content Marketing to Attract More Customers-Part 1

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[As some of you know, we like to promote good ideas for other bloggers out there that are in the Agile space. We haven’t heard from Ed Hill, our resident SEO expert in a while. Good to see some stuff that is useful for Agile Bloggers!]

Content marketing is the development and distribution of relevant and valuable content to attract, acquire and engage consumers.

Content Marketing Builds Trust with Customers
Content Marketing Builds Trust with Customers

If you’re marketing your small to medium business, you’ve seen the frenzy over content marketing. Why is content marketing getting so much attention? Why is content so effective at building traffic and sales leads?

We’re going to quickly cover:

  • What content marketing can do for your business
  • Why it works to attract customers to your online business
  • What to write about
  • How to get started

Just in the last week I’ve seen several articles on major media sites like Search Engine World, Forbes and the Huffington Post. You can skip the Huffington opinion piece, which claims, “There is no formula”, while checking out Drew Hendricks coverage of useful content building tools in Tips For Building A Strong Content Marketing Plan For 2014 . While there is no formula for quality content marketing, there is a process that you can use for your content marketing. 

Because you’re focused on marketing a small or medium business, you may not have a large enough team or the time for the formal content strategy process. But you don’t want to start without planning. You can’t build traffic by randomly posting social media snippets and blog articles on topics that don’t matter to your customers. There is a happy balance between the two extremes. We’re going to walk through a quick and effective process that mixes some practices from content strategy and methods from search engine optimization. The goal here is to quickly deliver content that matters to your customer and helps fulfill your goals as a business.

Content creation is a powerful and effective marketing strategy to build web traffic and sales leads, but it’s also expensive in terms of time and effort. 

What Content Marketing Delivers for Your Business

  • Relevant content is ideal for building customer rapport and trust
  • Consistent content creation helps to form a relationship where customers learn how to solve their problems and come to rely on your business for trustworthy information
  • Reassuring content such as testimonials and reviews helps customers lose their fear of loss, which is a natural part of the buying cycle
  • Because content marketing seeks to answer customer questions and doubts it’s appropriate at almost every stage of the buying cycle
  • Content marketing is also a rich source of relevant content that search engines will favor with higher search engine visibility and increased natural search traffic
  • Building carefully crafted headlines for your content will also deliver social media content that is easy for readers to share

How Much Content Should We Build to See Improvement in Web Traffic and Sales

  • My experience with content building shows that 100 to 300 pages of new blog or website content is needed to see a substantial increase in web traffic and sales leads
  • Building 51 to 100 pages of content can generate 48% more traffic than web sites with less than 50 pages, according to the Hubspot Marketing Benchmarks from 7000 Businesses

When practiced consistently, I’ve seen content marketing deliver substantial increase in web traffic and sales. With an efficient team posting content on a daily basis and building and responding to your community of customers through social media, you could see traffic almost double as I did with my work for ApartmentGuide.com.

Why Does Content Marketing Work so Well?

When customers are seeking a solution to a problem or a product to fulfill a need they will typically gather information before buying anything that costs more than $100. The customer wants to strike a balance between the need to solve their problem and the fear of loss. The fear of loss occurs because the customer often does not know enough about what type of products can solve their problem or even how to find the best product to solve their problem. Especially when buying something they’ve never purchased before or when spending a large amount of money, the customer begins to fear that they will buy the wrong product, pay too much for the product or even buy a product that fails to solve their problem.

Content marketing eliminates the customers fear of loss by giving them enough information to understand:

  • what types of products are available to solve their problem
  • how to judge if a product is suitable for what they need
  • how to compare competing products
  • how to judge if the price is fair for the value offered
  • how to use the product to solve their problem
  • social proof content like reviews or testimonials can be especially reassuring to customers

In part 2 we’ll talk about how to research the types of content that matter to your customers and then how to start the content marketing process.

Leadership is Stewardship

northpoint-be-rich-campaignOne of my personal living heros is Andy Stanley, the pastor of North Point Community Church who I’ve heard speak about leadership and stewardship many times.

One of my most favorite quotes of his in regard to this idea is the following:

Leadership is stewardship, it’s temporary and you’re accountable.

I love this dynamic because it brings to light two valuable points that we all must take notice of, especially if you are in fact in positions of leadership.

The first point is that it’s very temporary – no one lasts forever as a leader within their organization and role. Things change, times change, and very quickly organizations need to drop the old and bring in the new. Oftentimes this means bringing in younger talent to replace and continue to build the momentum of the business.

Sometimes this truth can be very difficult for some to fully grasp and admit – that there will be a time when they will have to give up their role as a leader, their title, and their position for fresher and more able hands. Many of us, unfortunately, have experienced this in the context of bad leadership and a leader who refused to give up their seat at the top because of their ego, pride, and selfishness. The fallout, naturally, was just as negative.

The second point is closely tied to the first and is just as overlooked as the first as well. The idea is that you’re simply responsible for the time you have as a leader and that your actions and leadership will direct the course of the business and many people’s lives – that’s a big responsibility and burden!

It’s a good burden to bear but it’s not one that all leaders are aware of and/or cognizant of enough – that their actions, words, and thought-patterns really do matter and that it is in their best interest to consider their time in leadership of the utmost importance. Combine this with the fact that it’s temporary and it means that you really don’t have much time to lose – you must create significant impact while you are there or your time will appear, historically, as just another blip on the radar and you’ll be forgotten as just another guy who sat at the end of the table for a time.

No one wants to be remembered that way – we all must make the necessary and right decisions to lead our teams and organizations well, create the value that they need to be highly productive, and give them the tools to make that happen.

Leadership is less about telling others what to do (in fact it’s rarely that at all) and more about giving them the right and privilege to speak into their own roles and responsibilities with freedom and joy. Out of this enjoyment comes extreme productivity and value.

Healthcare.gov – A Great Example of Failing… without Agile

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This is a story of contrast between two popular methods of software development. One is called “waterfall,” the other, “agile.”

Waterfall development favors listing a huge set of requirements for a system up front, letting developers go away for months (if not longer) and expecting a huge software product in the end.

The agile method does the opposite, favoring work done in phases, delivering “minimum shippable” parts of a software system in weekly or biweekly cycles. This allows for iterating — or adjusting to hiccups discovered in the previous cycle, changing features or quashing bugs quickly and avoiding getting an end product that doesn’t look a thing like what your users need.

Like many government projects, HealthCare.gov was developed under the waterfall approach — and to its near doom.

The key findings in the presentation found here come on Page 5. Even though it was written in March, the slide sums up most of the key problems we eventually saw with the rollout of HealthCare.gov last month: limited testing time, evolving requirements, over-reliance on contractors and “stacking” of all the phases of development. The really damaging decision, according to the consultants: launching “at scale.”

Find the full story here, and the slides here.

[HT: NPR]